Tag Archives: Christine Walkden

Great British Garden Revival – Episode 9 Fruit Trees & Ornamental Bedding

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Hope you are enjoying the show as much as we are. Here is a list of the plants mentioned in Episode 9 – click on the plant links for more info about the plants.

To look up more plants:

  • Get the ‘Joy of Plants’ smartphone/tablet app so you can look up plants whenever you like www.joyofplants.com/apps

Episode 9 Fruit Trees with Toby Buckland

Malus (Apple)

Malus ‘Crawley Beauty’ (‘Apple Crawley Beauty’)

Pyrus communis ‘Conference’ (Pear Conference)

Prunus domestica ‘Victoria’ (Plum Victoria)

Prunus insititia (Damson)

Mespilus germanica (Medlar)

Prunus (Cherry)

Cydonia oblonga (Quince)

Prunus domestica (Plum)

Plum ‘President’

Gage (a type of plum)

Cydonia oblonga (Quince)

Ficus carica ‘Brown Turkey’ (Fig Brown Turkey)

Prunus persica (Peach)

Malus domestica ‘Bleinheim Orange’ (Apple ‘Blenheim Orange’)

Malus  ‘John Downie’ (Crab apple)

Malus x zumi var. calocarpa ‘Golden Hornet’ (Crab apple ‘Golden Hornet’)

Prunus domestica (Greengage)

Malus ‘Red Devil’ (Red Devil apple)

Malus ‘Bramley’ (Bramley apple)

Malus ‘Discovery’ (Discovery apple)

Ways to grow in small gardens: against walls as a fan or cordon, espalier

Types of rootstock: dwarf, semi-dwarf, vigorous. Choose semi-dwarf for cordons.

When planting, make sure the join between the tree and rootstock is above ground.

Crab apples make great jelly, chilli jelly, mint jelly. You can freeze apples to make juice.

You can look up lots more fruit trees in our app and Plant Finder by looking at Browse by group/Fruit/Fruit trees.

Episode 9 Ornamental Bedding with Christine Walkden

Carpet bedding & 3D bedding was popular with the Victorians.

“Choose a couple of plants that take your fancy and start experimenting…”

Locations to see carpet and 3D bedding:

Waddesdon Manor, Buckinghamshire – home to the Rothschilds

Eastbourne Parade carpet gardens

Bournemouth edible flower bedding www.bournemouth.gov.uk/parks

Bedding plants:

Begonia

Ageratum (Floss flower)

Helichrysum (Everlasting paper daisy)

Sedum (Stonecrop)

Campanula isophylla (Bell flower)

Leucanthemum

Armeria maritima (Sea thrift)

New varieties of plants are available for bedding with longer flowering times and greater resistance to pests and disease.

Impatiens (Busy Lizzie)

Busy Lizzie Divine

Begonia semperflorens (old variety)

Begonia ‘Lottie’ (new variety)

Antirrhinum (Snapdragon) – (old bedding plant)

Perennial hardy Penstemon (new, better plant, flowers 5-6 months and is tough & resilient)

Solenostemon (also known as Coleus) old bedding plant

Perilla frutescans (Beefsteak plant) (new plant – also edible in stir fries etc.)

Alstroemeria (Peruvian Lily)

Alstroemeria ‘Indian Summer’ (Peruvian Lily) new variety

Gerbera (Transvaal daisy)

Argyranthemum (Marguerite)

Cosmos

Salvia (Sage)

Pelargonium (Geranium) – easy to take cuttings

Edible bedding plants:

Calendula officinalis (Pot marigold)

Alternanthera

Pennisetum glaucum ‘Purple Majesty’ (Millet)

Viola (Pansy)

Helianthus (Sunflower)

Musa (Banana)

Dianthus (Carnation, pink)

Dahlia

Beta vulgaris subsp. cicla ‘Ruby Chard’ (Chard)

Capsicum annuum (Ornamental chilli)

Capsicum annuum ‘Super chilli’ (Ornamental chilli)

Tropaeolum (Nasturtium) – peppery flavour

Important: Not all ornamental plants are safe to eat. You can check the Hazardous rating in the Joy of Plants web Plant Finder or app to find out whether a plant is harmful or poisonous before eating it. Some plants are toxic!

Carpet bed in a box – drainage is all important. Choose compact plants that give a contrast of colour, texture and habit. Water plants the night before you want to plant them. Brush soil off plants with a make-up brush!

Save cash by taking your own cuttings.

Taking cuttings:

On the plant look for this year’s growth – this is a soft wood cutting.

Cut just below a pair of leaves on the stem, strip leaves and leave 5 leaves remaining (too few leaves and the plant won’t be able to photosynthesise).

Dip the cutting in water + dissolved vitamin C instead of rooting compound.

Plant in compost around the edge of a pot. Leave until new shoots grow, then repot.

You can look up lots more fruit trees in our app and Plant Finder by looking at Browse by group/Bedding.

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