Monthly Archives: December 2013

Great British Garden Revival plant list Episode 3 (Cottage gardens & Houseplants)

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Hope you are enjoying the show. Here is a list of the plants mentioned in Episode 3, with links to our plant info pages for more info about the plants.

Like our plant info? To look up more plants:

  • Get the ‘Joy of Plants’ smartphone/tablet app so you can look up plants whenever you like www.joyofplants.com/apps

Episode 3 – Cottage Gardens with Carol Klein

Alchemilla (Ladies mantle)

Origanum vulgare (Marjoram)

Saponaria officinalis (Soapwort)

Phlox

Lunaria annua (Honesty)

Oenothera (Evening primrose)

Aster cordifolius ‘Little Carlow’

Rudbeckia fulgida var. deamii (Coneflower)

Cosmos bippinatus (Cosmos)

Dahlia ‘Classic Swan Lake’

Sanguisorba (Burnet)

Achillea (Yarrow)

Eryngium (Sea holly)

Eryngium eburneum (Sea holly)

Verbascum (Mullein)

Dierama pulcherrimum (Angel’s fishing rod)

Lathyrus latifolius (Sweet pea)

Lathyrus latifolius ‘Pink pearl’ (Sweet pea)

Helianthus (Sunflower)

Buddleja (Butterfly bush)

Anemone hupehensis (Japanese anemone)

Salvia (Sage)

Look up more plants suitable for cottage gardens in our apps and Plant Finders by searching Find plants / Garden style & size / Cottage garden

Episode 3 – Houseplants with Tom Hart Dyke

Monstera deliciosa (Swiss cheese plant)

Ficus elastica  (Rubber plant)

Begonia

Orchid

Drosera binata (Sundew)

Drosera capensis (Cape sundew)

Sarracenia

Ficus Benjamina ‘Starlight’ (Weeping fig)

Tillandsia (Air plant)

Tillandsia aeranthos (Air plant)

Tillandsia cyanea (Air plant)

Puntia micro dasis

Streptocarpus ‘Crystal Ice’ (Cape primrose)

Gloxinia

Sinningia leukotricha

Dracaena

Dracaena fragrans ‘Massangeana’ (Dragon’s Blood Tree)

Platycerium bifurnatum (Stag’s horn fern)

Spathiphyllum ‘Sensation’ (Peace lily)

Look up more houseplants in our apps and Plant Finders by searching Find plants / Garden style & size / Indoors

Or Browse plants and look through the group of Houseplants.

Author: Terri Jones

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Great British Garden Revival plant list Episode 2 (Topiary & Roof gardens)

Hope you are enjoying the show. Here is a list of the plants mentioned, with links to our plant info pages for more info about the plants. If you like our plant info you can:

  • Get the ‘Joy of Plants’ smartphone/tablet app so you can look up plants whenever you like www.joyofplants.com/apps

Episode 2 – Topiary with Rachel de Thame

Why do we do it? For fun!

Crataegus (Hawthorn)

Laurus nobilis (Bay)

Buxus sempervirens (Box)

Taxus baccata (English yew)

Look up more topiary plants in our apps and Plant Finders by searching
Find plants / Plant uses / Topiary

Episode 2 – Roof gardens with James Wong (aka @Botanygeek)

Why do we do it? Mop up pollution, cool overheated buildings, provide an oasis in the urban desert.

Eucalyptus – there are many forms, so you’ll need to look them up

Cordyline (Cabbage tree)

Cordyline australis (Cabbage tree)

Erigeron karvinskianus (Mexican fleabane)

Gaura lindheimeri (Bee blossom)

Phormium (Flax lily)

Lavandula (Lavender)

Ornamental grasses

Stipa gigantea (Golden oats grass)

Carex comans – bronze-leaved (Bronze sedge)

Imperata cylindrica ‘Rubra’ joyofplants.com?q=1&p=206

Pennisetum alopecuroides (Fountain grass)

Cestrum nocturnum

Tulbaghia (Wild garlic)

Agapanthus (African lily)

Miscanthus (Silver grass)

Look up plants with maritima or litoralis in their names – this means they grow by the seaside and can cope with windy conditions and shallow soil.

Look up plants suitable for seaside/rooftop locations in our apps and Plant Finders by searching Find plants / Garden style & size / Seaside garden

Author: Terri Jones

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Waiting… Waiting… Waiting

Recently I was a member of the rapt audience, willingly entrapped by Monty Don who was speaking at Dorking Halls. He began by showing a picture of his own garden when it was a cold and windswept field – a very large vista of bumpy grass clumps with their flattened beige flower-stalks lying on top of them. Did everyone simultaneously shrink at the enormity of the task that he had faced, whilst just longing to get stuck in, one spade turn at a time? The message Monty Don gave was, not to just get stuck in. At first one should simply observe.

This waiting time is a mighty and important message to gardeners. We do all long to start digging, to lay claim, to change. Waiting, Monty Don said, wasn’t passive. It is truly getting to know the territory. One should learn the character of the place – the squidgy parts, the dry parts, the parts where nothing much grows. Then there is the movement of light over the year and, what lies beyond, that which should be concealed and that which can be used. Very few of us are lucky enough to start with a virgin plot. In a garden that has been acquired it is worth waiting to see what turns up; obviously bulbs will make their show, and then go, as will perennials. Even a bare and scrubby shrub may be revealed as a treasure. The ‘I want it NOW feeling’ and the need, perhaps to sweep everything away and start-over can be expensive in a well-stocked garden.

Once the period of observation has ended and we begin to plant the garden the need to wait can become an intense irritant. Beautiful gardens need patience and planning and the garden works best if you choose and plan your planting. Sometimes, the search for a specific plant can take months, if not a year or two and is far worse than finding a matching handbag! Patience is almost anti-matter these days – and it shouldn’t be.

We all try to cheat time. Plants are bought in containers, not seed packets. If we have money it is large containers and even spindly six-metre trees. Even with this modest shortcut one moves into a further period of waiting. This is a time-frame that covers years, if not decades; patience must be developed. One needs to look at the plants in the garden and to observe the gentle process of their evolution. Their timelines can be an ongoing joy. What ‘instant’ can never deliver is that ride on the heft of time. Over time the whippersnapper sapling will be sturdy enough to be climbed. It will rise towards the sky and spread its branches so one can lie in their shade. And then, you may say to your child: “I planted that when you were born”.

The best is worth waiting for.

Susan A. Tindall

Rowan 1995

Rowan 1995

Rowan 2002

Rowan 2002

Rowan 2013

Rowan 2013

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Great British Garden Revival plant list episode 1

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Hope you are enjoying the show. Here is a list of the plants mentioned, with links to our plant info pages for more info about the plants. If you like our plant info you can:

  • Get the ‘Joy of Plants’ smartphone/tablet app so you can look up plants whenever you like www.joyofplants.com/apps

Episode 1 Wild Flowers
Rhinanthus minor (Yellow rattle)
Scabiosa columbaria (Small scabious)
Leontodon hispidus (Rough hawkbit)
Centaurea (Knapweeds)
Succisa pratensis (Devil’s bit scabious)
Daucus carota (Wild carrot)
Lotus corniculatus (Bird’s foot trefoil)
Thymus serpyllum (Wild thyme)
Leucanthemum vulgare (Oxeye daisy)
Knautia arvensis (Field scabious)
Hypericum perforatum (St John’s wort)
Primula (Primrose)
Viola (Violet)
Papaver rhoeas (Poppy)
Campanula rotundifolia (Harebell)
Eupatorium cannabinum (Agrimony)

Episode 1 Front Gardens

Convolvulus cneorum (Bindweed )
Ceratostigma willmottianum (Plumbago)
Lonicera
Crab apple
Dianthus
Pachysandra terminalis
Clematis armandii
Anemone hupehensis
Rheum
Rubus idaeus
Rhododendron
Aster
Rudbeckia
Grasses
Antirrhinum (Snapdragon)

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The joy of the Latin name

Amateur gardeners often struggle with the Latin names that define their plants. There are frequent pleas for common rather than Latin names. The common names provide rich material for native and useful plants and these often attract a wealth of picturesque names. These differ in various parts of the country. How picturesque is ‘piss-a-bed’ and ‘Irish daisy’ or ‘clock flower’ (alternate names for the common dandelion). Other names may reflect their herbal properties, though they never seem to define the acute evacuation that’s almost de rigueur as a component of the cure.

The application of the common name starts to fall down with foreign introductions, especially plants that come from countries that have been colonized. The colonists often mapped the new world in terms of the old, naming plants after vaguely similar English plants. Thus you get ‘Bluebells’ that refer to different annual and perennial plants rather than the bulb of English woodlands. Other plants come ‘unlabelled’ as it were and just occasionally bear the names given by the native inhabitants of those territories, and these often appear uneasy in print.

In order to provide the sought after common names, translations of Latin names are often made that reflect the quality of the plant that botanists consider important. Sometimes they are helpful in featuring recognisable features, locations in which they grow, plants that they resemble, etc. At other times one struggles to interpret terms such as ‘mucilaginous sap’ or ‘lacking bracteoles’ into something readily meaningful.

Overall, it is better to simply get to grips with universal and generally uncontroversial Latin names and to stop expecting everything to be handed to you on a digested plate.

I must admit, at this point that I often forget the names of plants in my own garden and mentally refer to them as ‘the one with the curious flowers that needs to be by a path to be noticed’ and ‘the one that gets leggy if you don’t keep pruning it’. There are also many occasions when, returning from a garden visit, I find I have carefully transcribed Crocus ‘Snow Bunting’ into my notebook instead of the name of the tree it appeared under several months ago.

Image

Crocus ‘Snow bunting’ (misapplied)

Piss-a-bed and friend

Piss-a-bed and friend

Susan A. Tindall

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